Reports_3

Recent Posts


Tags

#keepemwet Native Fish Society Jason Atkinson Clackamas Fishing Report Pink Salmon Spey Hardy Reel North Fork Nehalem Brown Trout Chinook Salmon Marty Sheppard Elk & Sixes Deschutes River Alliance Tarpon invasive species Springers Caddis Salmon Makos Trask Big Bugs Scientific Anglers Salmon Fly North Umpqua high water Czech Nymph OPST Sea-run Cutthroat Mr. Skittles Coho Salmon photography Sage Brian Silvey Invasives Salmonflies Trout-a-Thon Czech Nymphing Boston Whaler Grande Ronde Reed College Skagit F.I.S.T. Oregon Trout Trail Black Friday Fish-a-long Bahamas Winter Steelhead Winter Trout Rob Crandall Brian O'Keefe Coastal Streams small creeks Sea-runs Oregon Trout Bum Waders Couch Fishing native fish Ascension Bay F3T Belize Whitefish Fishing Skaters Trout Skeena Nick Wheeler Switch Rod flies Casa Blanca Zombies Montana Photo shoot Nehalem River Rainbow Trout Waterdog Crooked River Pacific ocean Snow Redsides Trout Unlimited Trout Bum Road Trip Redband Trout Green Drakes San Diego Clackamas River Redside Rainbow Streamers McKenzie Puget Sound Morrish's Fluttering Stone Metolius Fall River Sandy River Dry Fly Bull Trout steelhead flies Big Trout Josh linn Wild fish Jeff Helfrich Instagram March Browns Simms Silvey's Super Sinker North Coast Gig Harbor Euro Nymphing Steelhead fly Metolius River Mako Shark Sage Fly Rods Summer Steelhead John Day River Native Trout Steelhead Fly Fishing Class Oregon Back Roads Soft Hackles Frank Moore Goldenstones Road Trip Spring Trout Rendezvous Oregon Fly Czar NORCAL BC hot water Salmonfly Black Friday Fish Fest PMDs Little Creek Outfitters Klickitat McKenzie River Maupin Coho Wilson River Small Streams Elk River West Slope Cutthroat Hosted Trip Klamath River BWOs G. Loomis Carp Cutthroat Trout Bonefish Guided Fishing Smithers John Day Gil Muhleman Kenny Morrish Deschutes Deschutes River Salmonfly hatch Keepemwet Fishing North Coast: Shad

Archive

Fishing Reports

Snow Day

Joel La Follette - Thursday, February 07, 2019


Nick's Fishing Report

Low and clear conditions continue to hold through the area with the low-pressure system hanging around. With the possibility of more snow coming to the area don’t expect our rivers to jump up soon. As this cold weather passes and we get back to our normal rainy pattern, we will continue to see fresh winter steelhead swimming up our waterways. Our local rivers and the coast even with the lower water levels still continue to produce fish. It’s just the catch ratio isn’t outstanding, but just that one fish can make your day. Even in good years you still can’t catch them from the couch. 

Josh and I made a break for the coast. With the help of Todd Rettmann from Water Time Outfitters, we all braved Snowmageddon 2019. Like stated above, all the rivers out on the coast were low and clear so expectations weren’t high, but all of us know its winter steelheading so who cares. It’s all about big flies and cold fingertips. 

We started out the day with a coating of snow across everything. After a short drive and slide, as in Todd sliding down after his boat on his butt, we were floating down the river. It was a surreal experience with snow-covered trees and not another soul on the river. These are the days I really think of when someone says winter steelheading. You feel deeply engulfed in your surroundings, somehow connected to it all. Of course, you want to connect with a fish but it no longer matters as much. You just enjoy the day. 

As our float continued, and we fought off the numbness of the cold day, we filled the fishless moments with heavy laughter and good eats. Toward the end of the day as Josh fished a tail out of a run we heard a loud cry of joy come out Josh. His number came up, and a Steelhead grabbed his fly. Unfortunately, just like us, his fish was so lethargic from the cold water it swam right for the net. Josh was now thinking he had caught the smallest steelhead ever with such a short battle but was surprised with a beautiful wild fish. 

Our day ended with most of the snow melted and an easy drive back over the pass. The lesson with this story is even with bad conditions, and low fish counts, expectations set to your current situation makes for a great day. Take what you can get, and if you get lucky your day just got that much better.  


Josh's Fishing Report

Nick and I went fishing this weekend with the guys from Water Time Outfitters. Sunday night we met up over at the lodge on the North coast so we could get up early and not have to battle with coming over the pass. There was a forecast for snow, but the way this winter has been going it probably would not happen. 

Our plan was to have a semi-casual day. We got up around 5:30 AM. To our surprise, there was an inch or two of snow on the ground. Immediately I knew this would be a great day. Winter steelheading in the snow is one of my favorite things. 

We drank a little coffee and headed for the boat launch. We were the first boat on the water and it seemed like it would probably stay that way all day. Last year Todd and I fished together and immediately he was giving me a hard time about a slip I took at the boat launch. I was telling him to watch out as it might come back on him when low and behold we pitch the boat off the trailer and Todd was yanked off his feet. He was basically being drug down the boat launch by the boat. It reminded me of a scene from Spies Like Us where Chevy Chase and Dan Aykroyd are in training. They get yanked off the dock by a ski boat and drug around a lake. It was a wild scene!

The river was low and clear with a blanket of snow making for awe-inspiring views and high hopes of fish catching. We fished every piece of water first. The three of us were pounding each run with nothing to show for it. By late afternoon we were approaching tidewater and a run where Todd and I had previous success. Todd fished through the run first with no fish. 

The run is big, wide, and slow. I switched up to slower sinking tip and an unweighted pink fly. I was fishing through the run and was getting towards the tail out. I waded halfway across the river casting to the other bank thinking about this being one of my last casts and then it happened. 

Well, something happened anyway. There was a soft pull, no head shake, no yank, just a soft pull that took line and kept pulling. I set the hook knowing it was a steelhead. I gave out a yell and reeled trying to come tight on the fish. After about 30 seconds of reeling, I was doubting if it was really a steelhead and thought it could be a sucker. I was a bit disappointed and confused. 

I got the fish within 40’ and finally could see it. It appeared to be what looked like the smallest winter steelhead to ever swim up a coastal river. At that point, I voiced my opinion to Todd who was standing right next to me. I got it closer and could see not that small after all and it was actually a nice fish. Maybe it was colder than we were, or maybe it had moved up into the tail out where I hooked it. We netted it and snapped a few pics before sending it on its way. 

I’m still marveling at the weirdness of my encounter with that steelhead. And despite the cold fingers, it was a great day!







Now, go make your own.

Breezing into Fall Fishing

Joel La Follette - Thursday, November 08, 2018

You may find this hard to believe, but all across our state fly rods are being ceremoniously tucked away for the winter. It seems that for some anglers the end of the season comes with the turning of a calendar page and is tied more to tradition than reality. While the restraints of winter weather may preclude some adventures during the colder months, there are still many positive distractions available to the dedicated...

As we wait for additional rain to draw fresh winter Steelhead home, the precipitation we received this past week has had a positively influenced east-side streams. Unfortunately, the unstable weather of fall tends to bring pressure differences that transform gentle breezes into gale-force winds. These blustery conditions materialize this past weekend on the Deschutes and John Day providing quite the challenge for those swinging for the last of our summer fish. With the wind forecast dropping under 10 mph this weekend, it would be worth the drive.

Meanwhile, winter tactic Trout fishing fever has taken hold in the shop and the team has been spending more time creating BWO imitations than winter Steelhead box fillers. This recent uptick in Trout interest is due in part to the infectious enthusiasm shown by the Reed College students we hosted this past week. Daily discussions on the attributes of hook styles, tippet material, and Euro nymphing rods have overshadowed evaluations of grain-weight windows and sink-tips. This is a refreshing change of pace for fall/winter, but I'm sure when the first rumors of winter chrome echo in the shop the guys will be layering up and swinging again.


Until then, the Fly Czar has restocked the bins with some of our most productive patterns. Whitefish and Redsides have been recently fooled by this fresh collection of Baetis and Caddis imitations as we field tested them on the Deschutes.

During the aforementioned jaunt to the river with the Reed College class, we utilized three different rigging techniques. All three caught fish, but small nymphs fished deep during the full sun hours produced the best. The high winds and pressure change probably had something to do with that, but we'll retest that theory this weekend. October Caddis are still flitting about in addition to the hatches of BWOs and tan Caddis, so ask Josh for his OC Special.

I will admit to being more enthusiastic about haunting the banks of the Metolius this winter after she served me a large helping of humble pie during the Trout-a-thon. Look to see me trekking through the snow this winter as I practice for next year's event. Mayflies, Caddis and floating Kokanee carcasses are currently providing protein for the residents. Whitefish spawn is also something to consider this time of year as they cuddle up to reproduce.

The weather may get a little more challenging for some, but layer up and get out there. You have a few weeks to train for our Black Friday Fish-a-long so get to it! You want to be in top form for this event!

First Nation Extended Summer Season

Joel La Follette - Thursday, October 18, 2018


It may not be politically correct to say Indian Summer, but how else can you describe our weather? The last few days have been absolutely incredible. Next week though, the Weather Channel girl is threatening a dampish change to the forecast. Enjoy the sun while you can, but look for your fishing options to improve as rain moves in. We could use some water!

The Fly Czar and our new Head of Security headed east this past Monday after overseeing the very successful Fly Fishing Symposium. LT has recently retired from the Portland PD and you will see him in the shop occasionally keeping the peace between the Fly Czar and Mr. Skittles. In any case, the guys found a few willing fly grabbers on their adventure, but also found the take-out gate locked at Starvation. Check in with Josh before you make plans to launch a drift boat.

Meanwhile, the Deschutes continues to be rather good for Trout and not too bad for Steelhead. We are not seeing the best return ever, but it is Steelhead fishing, and it's never easy. Hatches of misc. Mayflies, October Caddis and small tan Caddis are keeping things interesting for Trout chasers.

Our recent infatuation with Czech nymphing has really upped the interest in Trout fishing around the shop. After I graduated from the Fly Czar's clinic last week, I spent 3 days on the Deschutes putting the skills I learned into practice. The number of fish landed over the trip was very impressive given the fact that I never made a cast with the fly line out of the rod. I did keep it a little "West Coast" by fishing a Silvey's Super Sinker and Caddis Pupa instead of the more Euro-style offerings. The Super Sinker was the star until Caddis started to flitter about, then the Pupa rocked it. It's nice to have that one-two punch on every cast.

Sea-run Cutty lovers have one last week to get it out of their system before the season comes to a close. Rain will help their efforts and will also draw fresh fish into tidewater for the Salmon fanatics. All good news for sure.

Closer to home, the Coho in the Clackamas are getting a little stale and the numbers of fresh fish returning are dropping off some. Rain may help, but we now wait for the first of the winter Steelhead to really provide the action. Let it rain.

A Quick Trip Around the State

Joel La Follette - Thursday, September 20, 2018

There is a sense of urgency from our patrons in the shop as anglers rush to cram as much as they can into the fleeting days of this shoulder season. There is still a touch of summer in the air, but fall has let us know that those warm days with soon be just a memory. This is the season we wait for all year long and it is here. The only problem is we have far too many angling choices and not enough time to enjoy them all.

While the Deschutes is still the number one destination for Trout and Steelhead anglers at the moment, there are other fisheries calling for our attention. Let's just take a quick tour of the state...


Down in Southern Oregon the Rogue River has been the highlight with Steelhead returns well above average. Half-pounders and adults are drawing fly swingers including yours truly. I fished with a friend above Gold Hill and swung up this feisty native on last week's Fly of the Week, the Green Butt Silver Hilton. I'm heading back this weekend. Trout fishing on the Rogue would be a good option too as Rainbows and Cutthroat were hard to keep off my Steelhead flies.

Marlon RampyMy buddy, Marlon Rampy continues to score monster Rainbows in the Williamson River down near Chiloquin. These Steelhead size Trout are an impressive opponent on 6 weight rods. If you have never tested this fishery, now is a good time. Goat leaches, Damsel nymphs, soft-hackles and sparsely tyed Woolly Buggers should be in your box and an intermediate sinking line on your reel.

Over on the coast, Salmon are nosing into tidewater and making their way upriver on many of the North Coast streams. I battled a dandy on Monday until she sliced through my tippet with her pearly whites. Seeing 20 pounds of chrome take to the air is a thrill for sure! Sea-run Cuttys are following the herd and I saw several chasing bait on the surface. Streamers on a fast swing will insight hard grabs from these migratory Trout. I also like to skid a fall Caddis imitation across the surface of faster tail-outs to pull the action to the top. Give it a try.

Closer to home, the Clackamas is seeing a fairly healthy return of Coho Salmon this year. While our local fly guys are just starting to take notice, there have been more than a few taken on feathers. We can give you some pointers when you stop in for flies. Ask the Fly Czar for his secret weapon.

Green Drakes, or at least the fall version of this legendary hatch have been the talk of Metolius anglers over the last few weeks. Bull Trout are also getting some attention as they await the passing of returning Kokanee. I'm scheduled to be on the Met at the end of the month for some silly photo shoot and will have a better report then.

Back on the Deschutes it's business as usual. While Columbia basin Steelhead numbers are down, fly swingers are still hooking some impressive fish in the Deschutes. You may have to cover some water, but there are fish to be found. While some have resorted to sink-tips and winter patterns, true believers are still scoring on dry line presentations of artful traditionals.

Trout fishing on the D continues to be good, but most anglers are chasing the migratory versions. Watch for hatches of misc Mayflies to bring back-eddies alive with gorging Redsides.

This cornucopia of opportunities won't last forever. Get out and enjoy some of the best fishing of the season, right now.


Riding the Heat Wave

Joel La Follette - Thursday, July 12, 2018
Nick Wheeler Photo
We're heading into a warm spell this week that will make standing waist deep in a cool stream sound like heaven right here on planet earth. As long as you're wet you might as well make a few casts. You just might have to think outside the box to find water void of swimmers, floaters and stick chasing canines, but there are options.

First on the hit parade is our favorite spring creek, the Metolius. Running at a chilly 48 degrees most of the year the Metolius is consistently inconsistent when it comes to fishing, but with a little leg work and some patience it can pay off with fat Rainbows and broad shouldered Bull Trout.

I found myself boots wet on the Met this past Monday and would gladly repeat the adventure even with the lack of measurable success. PMDs and misc. small Mayflies failed to draw much attention, but stories of bent rods filtered through the smoke in the filled campgrounds. Look for Mayfly hatches from 11ish into the evening. From the Gorge Campground upriver Goldenstones are crawling out on the bushes and getting fish and anglers excited. Old school Clark's Stones are getting it done pushing popular foam creations to plan B status. Bull Trout are present and taking nymphs and streamers much to the surprise of light tackle Trouters sharing the tales in those smokey camps.

Mr. Silvey rang me up the other day from his ranch near Maupin with a favorable report from the Deschutes. It seems the dry fly action has been good most mornings and that has recently extended into the early afternoon before the hot sun drives everyone including the fish into the shade. Evenings have been very good if the wind doesn't kick up. Misc. Mayflies, Caddis and Craneflies have been giving glimpses of what's possible with cooler river temps. So far, the Deschutes has been running slightly cooler than last year at this time. Brian does have some availability this month and reported that the fishing pressure has been light. Give him a call at 800-510-1702 to get in on the action. I find that Brian takes it to another level if you bring cookies. Just say'n.

Higher elevations offer another escape from the heat as the Callibeatus hatch kicks into high gear on our Cascade lakes. Clouds of these Mayflies are pulling timid lake residents to the surface on Mt Hood impoundments and Central Oregon lakes. My buddy, Jeff Perin from the Fly Fisher's Place in Sisters has threaten to take me out in his aluminum yacht to sample the action first hand. If I can free up some space on the calendar that might be a very interesting trip.

The last time we fished together I learned a new hook setting technique that involve not letting the fish know it was hooked. It's very effective for releasing the fish closer to where he was feeding and follows the #keepemwet mantra nicely. No, Jeff, I'm not going to forget the Sister's hook set.

For those ready to swing flies for summer Steelhead there have been confirmed encounters in the lower Deschutes. Floating lines, your favorite fly and a sack full of optimism is required. Fish numbers over the dams are optimistically creeping up.

Locally, it's going to be tough sledding on the Clackamas with the warmer temps and the rubber boat hatch in full swing. If you can pull yourself out of bed in the dark and be on the water when the sun pops up you have a chance at some fresh summer chrome, but note the river is already warm enough for a morning swim. It's not impossible, but maybe the mouth of the Deschutes or Klickatat is a better option.
Mitch Moyer Photo
Last, but surely not least is our theater of operations for this weekend's outing on Puget Sound. Reports filtering out of the Evergreen State have been exceptional and we're hoping for a repeat of last year's success for our group of adventurous anglers. Baitfish are plentiful and the resident Coho and Sea-run Cutthroat has been feasting on the abundance. The tides are identical to our last visit so our hopes are high. In any case, there will be S'mores involved.

The Dog Ate His Fishing Report

Joel La Follette - Thursday, December 14, 2017

The Fly Czar had Christmas shopping to do this weekend and I was tasked with getting a couple hundred tulip bulbs in the ground so we turned the duties of writing the fishing report this week over to our very own Mr. Skittles, Nick Wheeler. Nick and his buddy Kevin hit the Clackamas River on Sunday for a little winter Steelhead action and Nick filed this report...

Well, I guess the dog ate his fishing report... he sent this.

Not much to go on I know, but I'll try to fill in the blanks...

Last year at this time we were dealing with snow and plenty of water in our local rivers. This year, we could use a bit of the wet stuff to freshen up the action. The Sandy River is running low, cold and clear and would benefit from a good winter storm. Over on the Clackamas we have near summer water levels, but it remains the best local option for Steelhead chasers. Rob will fill us in on the action there during his Winter Steelhead Seminar as he has been on the water a few times this past week. Nick reported only a possible tug during this weekend float and that was optimistic. 

While the Deschutes area was cloaked in freezing fog occasionally this week as the temps dropped, it should be a fair bet for Trouters wishing to escape the holiday rush. Overcast skies and warmer temps forecast for the weekend could bring hatches of BWOs to your favorite backeddy. This might be the best option for stretching a fly line this weekend unless you feel like hitting the Metolius.

There you'll find the same warming pattern, with Sunday and Monday looking like the best chance for surface activity. Temps should reach into the high 40s during the day, with lows near freezing. No need to be there at the crack of dawn, so take your time and drive carefully over the passes. Bull Trout are always an option.

The north coast needs some rain as well and we may or may not get it. Any bump in river levels will help bring fish in as we have 8 foot tides over the next few days to encourage them to come home. We just need a little help from the sky. Go wash your car.


   

Things are looking up

Joel La Follette - Thursday, January 26, 2017

Opportunities abound as we are enjoying some of the best water conditions of the winter season. Reports are flooding in from all corners of the state as anglers break the bonds of cabin fever and venture out. Our forecasted flood waters receded quickly and most area rivers fell into shape as predicted. The Sandy never really went up and out as freezing levels dropped saving us from a potential torrent. We are looking at very little change as stable weather conditions move in until late next week.

Road conditions have improved on the east side, but there is still snow on the ground. Trout chasers are setting aside the chips and guacamole long enough to break free of the couch and hit the water. Midges, BWOs and Little Black Stones are offering up winter snacks for the residents of the Crooked, Deschutes and Metolius rivers. Getting down and funky with your standard nymphs is always an option if the surface party fails to excite. Bull Trout are chomping streamers on our favorite spring creek for those braving the streamside snow.

For an on-the-water report we turn now to our Fly Czar, Josh Linn...

I fished the Clackamas with Tom Larimer and Jake Zirkle from G Loomis over the weekend. We tested out a bunch of new rods from Loomis including the much talked about Asquith, and a new series that will be debuting soon that will be awesome. The river was in great shape having dropped quickly. We put in a little late and the boat traffic was light. We were able to pretty much fish everything we wanted. There is still a bunch of snow in Hood River and Tom wasn't able to get his jet sled dug out, so we piled into his drift boat. 

This was the first time I have fished with either of these guys and one of the things I noticed was Tom changes sink tips and flies for almost every run we fished. Now, we were testing a bunch of rods so I'm sure that was part of it, but I would have been more content to fish the same tip most of the time, probably 10 or 12' of t-11. This was my first time really fishing the 13' 7wt Asquith and boy is that rod something else. It was loaded with a 540gr Skagit Switch G2 from Airflo and that stick is a real winner. It casts far, throws big flies with ease and is as light as a feather. If you're in the market for a new rod, that would definitely be one to look at. While inventory is limited on all Asquith rods, we do have a few demos rotating through the shop. Call me and I'll hook you up for a test drive. 

As you can see from the photo above, it's a fish catcher too.
 



1
Contact Us

21570 Willamette Drive West Linn, OR 97068
503.850.4397

2014 Royal Treatment Fly Fishing
Privacy | Legal